Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs

November 2000

Customer Participants
(as of November 2000)
Rank Utility Program # of Participants
1 Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Green Power for a Green L.A. 65,000*
2 Public Service Company of Colorado Windsource/Renewable Energy Trust 21,000
3 Wisconsin Electric Energy for Tomorrow 12,000
4 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Greenergy/PV Pioneers 8,000
5 Wisconsin Public Service SolarWise for Schools 5,400
6 Madison Gas and Electric Wind Power 4,900
7 Portland General Electric Salmon-Friendly Power/Clean Wind Power 3,900
8 Austin Energy Green Choice 2,800
8 Tennesee Valley Authority Green Power Switch 2,800
10 PacifiCorp Blue Sky 2,700
Source: NREL

Notes:

* About half of the total are low-income customers that receive existing renewables at no additional cost.


Customer Participation Rates
(as of November 2000)
Rank Utility Program Participation Rate
1 Moorhead Public Service Capture the Wind 7.3%
2 Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Green Power for a Green L.A. 4.6%*
3 Madison Gas and Electric Wind Power 4.5%
4 Orcas Power & Light Cooperative Green Power 4.3%
5 Holy Cross Energy Wind Power 4.1%
6 Cedar Falls Utilities Wind Energy 3.6%
7 Eugene Water and Electric Board EWEB Windpower 3.4%
8 Central Electric Cooperative Green Power 2.9%
9 City of Bowling Green Green Power 2.8%
10 City of Ashland Solar Pioneers 2.6%
Source: NREL

* About half of the total are low-income customers that receive existing renewables at no additional cost.


New Renewable Resources Supported
through Green Pricing

(as of November 2000)
Rank Utility Resources Installed New Capacity
1 Los Angeles Department of Power and Water Wind 25.0 MW1
2 Public Service Company of Colorado Wind 15.7 MW2
3 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Landfill methane/PV 10.2 MW3
4 Madison Gas and Electric Wind 8.2 MW4
5 Wisconsin Electric Wind/hydro/landfill methane 7.2 MW5
6 TXU Wind 6.6 MW
7 Eugene Water and Electric Board Wind 6.5 MW
8 Platte River Power Authority Wind 5.9 MW6
9 Holy Cross Energy Wind 3.0 MW7
10 Tennesee Valley Authority Wind/PV 2.0 MW
Source: NREL

Notes: Austin Energy has announced 97 MW of wind, landfill methane, and solar that will be available in 2001; PSCo plans to add 36 MW of new wind by the end of 2001.

1 LADWP purchases wind power equivalent to approximately 25 MW from Enron and PacifiCorp.

2 PSCo sells 4.3 MW from its 20-MW wind project at wholesale to other Colorado utilities.

3 Includes capacity installed for the Greenergy and PV Pioneers I programs.

4 Madison Gas & Electric uses 3 MW of its 11.2-MW wind project to satisfy a state renewable energy mandate. The remainder of the project is supported through green pricing.

5 Wisconsin Electric purchases another 2.6 MW of existing landfill methane resources for its green pricing program.

6 Platte River supplies the power for programs offered by Fort Collins, Estes Park, Longmont, and Loveland.

7 Holy Cross Energy purchases its wind power from PSCo.


Premium Charged for New, Customer-Driven
Renewable Power
1

(as of November 2000)
Rank Utility Resources Premium
1 Austin Energy Wind/landfill methane/solar -0.5¢/kWh
2 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Landfill methane 1.0¢/kWh
3 Dakota Electric Association Wind 1.2¢/kWh
4 Great River Energy Wind 1.5¢/kWh2
4 Moorhead Public Service Wind 1.5¢/kWh3
6 Traverse City Light & Power Wind 1.6¢/kWh
7 Alliant Energy Landfill methane/wind 2.0¢/kWh
7 Minnesota Power Wind 2.0¢/kWh
7 Wisconsin Electric4 Wind/landfill methane/hydro 2.0¢/kWh
10 Holy Cross Energy Wind 2.5¢/kWh
10 Platte River Power Authority5 Wind 2.5¢/kWh
10 Public Service Company of Colorado Wind 2.5¢/kWh
10 Tri-State G&T Wind/landfill methane 2.5¢/kWh
Source: NREL

Note: The premium charged in a green pricing program can be a function of any number of variables, including but not limited to the renewable energy technology utilized, the quality of the renewable energy resource, the size of the project(s), the project and company financials, the availability of subsidies or incentives, inclusion of administrative and marketing costs, the utility's avoided cost of energy, the amount of renewables already in the utility mix, and whether participating customers shoulder the full cost of the program.

1 Includes only programs that have installed or announced firm plans to install new renewable resources.

2 Suggested retail price for member distribution cooperatives.

3 Adjusted to reflect the cost of 100% new wind power.

4 Three-fourths of the power comes from new renewable resources.

5 Serves Colorado municipal utilities of Estes Park, Fort Collins, Longmont and Loveland.


Skip footer navigation to end of page.